Internet of Things

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the inter-networking of physical devices, vehicles (also referred to as “connected devices” and “smart devices”), buildings, and other items embedded with electronics, software, sensors, actuators, and network connectivity which enable these objects to collect and exchange data. The IoT allows objects to be sensed or controlled remotely across existing network infrastructure, creating opportunities for more direct integration of the physical world into computer-based systems, and resulting in improved efficiency, accuracy and economic benefit in addition to reduced human intervention. When IoT is augmented with sensors and actuators, the technology becomes an instance of the more general class of cyber-physical systems, which also encompasses technologies such as smart grids, virtual power plants, smart homes, intelligent transportation and smart cities. Each thing is uniquely identifiable through its embedded computing system but is able to interoperate within the existing Internet infrastructure. Experts estimate that the IoT will consist of about 30 billion objects by 2020.

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“Things”, in the IoT sense, can refer to a wide variety of devices such as heart monitoring implants, biochip transponders on farm animals, electric clams in coastal waters, automobiles with built-in sensors, DNA analysis devices for environmental/food/pathogen monitoring, or field operation devices that assist firefighters in search and rescue operations. Legal scholars suggest regarding “Things” as an “inextricable mixture of hardware, software, data and service”.

These devices collect useful data with the help of various existing technologies and then autonomously flow the data between other devices. Current market examples include home automation (also known as smart home devices) such as the control and automation of lighting, heating (like smart thermostat), ventilation, air conditioning (HVAC) systems, and appliances such as washer/dryers, robotic vacuums, air purifiers, ovens, or refrigerators/freezers that use Wi-Fi for remote monitoring.

 

Applications

According to Gartner, Inc. (a technology research and advisory corporation), there will be nearly 20.8 billion devices on the Internet of things by 2020. ABI Research estimates that more than 30 billion devices will be wirelessly connected to the Internet of things by 2020.

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Based on the application domain, IoT products can be classified broadly into five different categories: smart wearable, smart home, smart city, smart environment, and smart enterprise. The IoT products and solutions in each of these markets have different characteristics.

Shanghai Zhichuan Electronic Tech has many inclinometers for IOT application. Such as ZCT215JA-STP-37 for smart street lamp, ZCT245J-NTQ-17 and ZCT215L-SQS-A1L-1907 for intelligent light box and ZCT245J-LAR-17 or ZCT245J-STQ-37 for manhole cover monitoring.

All these inclinometers are low cost, low power consumption and small size. Which can be widely used in IOT application.

 

References: Wikipedia

 

 

 

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Shanghai Zhichuan Electronic Tech Co., Ltd was established in 2002. As a leader in the tilt measuring and inclinometer fields. Our company always endeavors in designing and manufacturing more accurate, sensitive and reliable inclinometers, providing customer detailed and comprehensive solutions and service, assisting customers to improve their production efficiency so as to conquer challenges in fierce market competition.

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